describe Logan. Mr. Logan first days as a graduate student integrating the University of Kentucky in 1951.

First Days of School Desegregation Becoming a Detective

describe Logan. Mr. Logan first days as a graduate student integrating the University of Kentucky in 1951.

In the 1954 decision Brown v. Board of Education, the Supreme Court ruled segregation unconstitutional, thus desegregating public schools nationwide. This decision reversed the Supreme Court’s 1896 ruling supporting the traditional concept of “separate but equal” facilities.

In 1956, in Sturgis, Kentucky, ten black students attempted to attend the all white high school. Turned back by a jeering mob, they appealed to Governor A.B. Chandler who called out the National Guard. The Guard held back the crowd the next morning as nine black students entered the school foreshadowing what was to come in Little Rock just a year later. Other schools in Kentucky desegregated around this time as well and experienced varying levels of resistance.

As a result, desegregation in Kentucky’s schools took many years.In this investigation, you will listen to various oral history recordings of what it was like for many Kentuckians on the first day that their school was integrated. Based on the documents, you are to answer, how would you describe the first days of school desegregation in Kentucky? In other words, how did people in Kentucky experience school desegregation?

describe Logan. Mr. Logan first days as a graduate student integrating the University of Kentucky in 1951.

PART 1: Investigating the Evidence

Analyze each of the following:

  • VIEW Document A: Photos – National Guard, African-American student, and protesters in Sturgis, KY 1956.
  • George Logan
    • READ Document B OR LISTEN http://kyoralhistory.org/ohms-viewer-master/viewer.php?cachefile=1999OH01_81.xml
    • Oral History George Logan. Mr. Logan describes his first days as a graduate student integrating the University of Kentucky in 1951.
  • Alice Wilson
    • READ Document C OR LISTEN starting at the 21:00 minute mark through the 29:00 minute mark: http://kyoralhistory.org/ohms-viewer-master/viewer.php?cachefile=2002OH05_03c.xml
    • Oral History recording of Alice Wilson. Alice Wilson recalls her first days at Mayfield High School in Mayfield, Kentucky. She, along with a few African American high school students, were the first to integrate the school in the late 1950s.
  • Blaine Hudson
    • READ Document D OR LISTEN starting at the 14:00 minute mark through the 24:00 minute mark: http://kyoralhistory.org/ohms-viewer-master/viewer.php?cachefile=1999OH01_69.xml
    • Oral History Account, recorded August, 23, 2000. Blaine Hudson, who is a professor of history at the University of Louisville, tells of his family background and his experiences of going from an all Black elementary school to a primarily White high school in Louisville.
  • Rev. David Pettie
    • READ Document E  OR LISTEN starting at the 18:00 minute mark through the 24:00 minute mark: http://kyoralhistory.org/ohms-viewer-master/viewer.php?cachefile=1999OH01_84.xml
    • Oral History recorded August 16, 2001, Rev. David Pettie describes what went on in Sturgis, Kentucky the day one of his daughters was one of the first African American students to attend Sturgis High School.
  • James Howard
    • WATCH: https://ket.org/episode/KCIVS+000109
    • Oral History recorded, of James Howard, born in November 1942, in Sturgis, Ky. In 1956, at age thirteen, James, along with other students, attempted to integrate the all-white Sturgis high school, which was only blocks from his home.
  • Lloyd Arnold
    • READ Document G OR LISTEN starting at 30:00 minute mark through 35:00 minute mark: http://kyoralhistory.org/ohms-viewer-master/viewer.php?cachefile=1999OH01_82.xml
    • Oral History recording of Lloyd Arnold. Arnold talks about having to walk five miles to his high school and eventually quitting due to the harassment he experienced from the white community walking to school.
  • Anne Butler
    • READ Document H OR LISTEN starting at the 19:00 minute mark through the 25:00 minute mark: https://kyoralhistory.org/ohms-viewer-master/viewer.php?cachefile=1999OH01_33.xml
    • Oral History recording of Anne Butler. Butler talks about what it was like going to the newly integrated school system in Stanford, as well as what happened to the previously segregated black high school.

     

Part 2 – Cracking the Case:

Based on your analysis of the seven documents and citing evidence to support your answer, please write a minimum of one complete paragraph (you can write more)answering each the following question sets. Use the answer sheet provided and then submit.

 

What better way to discover the history surrounding a work of art than to visit the city where it was originally created? You will choose any artwork from any of the TALK museums to research, but it cannot be the same work you choose for the TALK assignment and the artwork cannot be made in Houston. You will want to print the checklist and itinerary documents so that you can refer to them while you are doing your research.

Art Historians agree that the geographical location in which a work was made affects the work’s style and meaning. Works made in the same general time period often share iconographic elements. Certain materials and techniques may be more prevalent in one geographical region and scarce in another during different time periods. These are the kinds of discoveries you will make in your travels. The TRAVEL documents you print will help you plan your trip so you know what to research in your travels.

Art helps construct the way societies grow and change, creating what is called culture. The values and mores of a society are created and reflected by its art. Patrons such as Kings, Pharaohs, and even today’s middle class patrons can sway the production of one work or one artist over another. Elements of art will last while others will fade away, only to be revived years later after taking a rest from the pages of Art History.

Art remains, however, a connecting force between peoples of all ages, places and especially after long periods of time have passed.

 

Overview of Assignment

You are going to study one work of art in depth, by virtually traveling to the city in which your one work of art was made. You will study what the city was like when the work of art was made and what that city is like today. Do NOT confuse the city in which the work was made with the city where the work is located today, which is usually in a museum today.

Sometimes it is the most difficult task to determine where your one work of art was actually made. You may need to research this fact first. You will choose any artwork from any of the TALK museums, but it cannot be the same work you choose for the TALK assignment and the artwork cannot be made in Houston. You will want to print the checklist and itinerary documents so that you can refer to them while you are doing your research.

Art connects you to places, people, and events in history.

It is an adventure.

There is no turning back.

TRAVEL: Objectives

Find the original city in which a historical masterwork was created

Travel to the city in which the work was made (virtually on the world wide web)

Distinguish between where a work of art was made and where it is now

Determine the impact of place and time on the content of a work of art

Name the visual characteristics or style for the period in which your one work of art was made

TR

Remember to include one library book citation at the bottom of your 2-page Letter to a Friend and an image of the artwork.

When you upload your assignment your letter will be checked by the Turnitin system for plagiarism. The system will tell you what your similarity score is, you are aiming for under 15%. If your score is higher than 15% edit your letter to reduce its similarity and upload it again. It can take the system a few minutes to check your paper (and up to 24 hours for resubmissions) so if you don’t receive a score immediately remember to check again before the due date. And don’t wait until the last minute!

IMPORTANT: If your submission has more than 15% similarity, your total possible grade will be reduce by the percent match.  For example, if you have a similarity score of 25%, that means the maximum grade your paper could earn would be 75% or 75/100 points. 

Tip!  Students often report that they have difficulty finding the city in which their artwork was originally made without using a library book for background information on the artist and where he lived and worked during the year the work was made.

TRAVEL: Objectives