Compare and contrast the ways in which territorial states formed across Afro-Eurasia and how they interacted with each other

Define a “territorial state.” How did territorial states differ from city-states? Compare and contrast the ways in which territorial states formed across Afro-Eurasia and how they interacted with each other (Map 3.2 will be helpful here). Why does your textbook contend that these territorial states pioneered “international diplomacy.”

Introduction to Part IV

Welcome to Part IV of the Research Assignment for HIST. In Part IV, you will find an additional source, learn the difference between bibliographic and footnote citations and draft a preliminary outline of your final essay, including (an) introductory paragraph(s) with your final (or near final) thesis statement.

After you’ve completed Part IV, your instructor or your teaching assistant will offer comments on your work.

RCI Research Assignment Part IV

Question 1 = One Additional Source

By now you have used many of the following databases to locate sources:

 

Depending on the type of source you still need, do an appropriate search to locate one additional source.

Using proper Chicago style citation, type the full bibliographic citation of one additional source that provides you with insights about the historical roots of your contemporary issue.

Question 2 = Footnotes

Full Footnotes Within the body of your essay, you will need to provide footnote citations for your sources. A footnote is a numerical reference (called a superscript) embedded in the narrative itself and has a corresponding number at the bottom of the page with the source’s citation. Different word processing programs have different toolbar commands for footnoting (sometimes called reference in MS Word), so you’ll need to familiarize yourself with how yours works (note that footnotes are not the same as a footer). The major difference between bibliographic and footnote citations is the that bibliographic citations address the source as a whole, while footnotes (full or abbreviated) hone in on specific pages (or parts of the source). There are other important differences as well, including the order of an author’s name (first last vs. last, first) and punctuation. Consult the Chicago style, page for a refresher on the differences between bibliographic and footnote citations (you may remember this from LRA1). In your LRA 4 Word doc under a Question 2 heading, enter the correct full footnote citation for one of your monographs. Label it as “Full Footnote.”  You can use (a) page number(s) that correspond(s) with an example that you will use in your final essay. Abbreviated Footnotes For any single source, you should abbreviate all subsequent footnotes after the first one in the paper. Using the Chicago-style examples as references, enter the correct abbreviated footnote citation for the same monograph you used for the full footnote. Label it as “Abbreviated Footnote.”  You can use (a) page number(s) that correspond(s) with an example that you will use in your final essay.

Question 3 = Final Essay Preliminary Outline

Creating a quality outline is a key step in nearly all research writing. There are a number of basic requirements for the final essay which inform your outline work. Your outline should include the following: 1.) draft of your introductory paragraph, complete with thesis statement; 2.) a list of the 2 to 3 key aspects that will make up the body paragraphs of your essay; and 3.) a list of which sources you intend to use under each aspect; 4.) an attempt at your concluding statement.

YOUR OUTLINE SHOULD FOLLOW THIS FORMAT:

I.  Introduction & Thesis: The introduction (one paragraph) introduces your topic (featuring a topical hook, or short example of your topic – consider using your contemporary news article as an opening example) and/or background information on the topic. The introductory paragraph ends with your thesis statement, which should tell the reader the temporal and geographic scope of your project and provide the structure for your argument by identifying the two to three key aspects of the topic you are investigating in the order they will be presented in your paper.

II.   Aspect 1: A word or phrase that connotes what the first aspect you will explore will be.

A.  Source 1: List the abbreviated footnote of a source that will be used in this paragraph.

B.  Source 2: List the abbreviated footnote of a source that will be used in this paragraph.

III. Aspect 2: A word or phrase that connotes what the second aspect you will explore will be.

A.   Source 3: List the abbreviated footnote of a source that will be used in this paragraph.

B.   Source 4: List the abbreviated footnote of a source that will be used in this paragraph.

IV. Aspect 3: A word or phrase that connotes what the third aspect you will explore will be.

A.   Source 5: List the abbreviated footnote of a source that will be used in this paragraph.

B.   Source 6: List the abbreviated footnote of a source that will be used in this paragraph.

 

V. Conclusion: The conclusion should revise and restate your thesis as a concluding statement, summarize your main points, and explain how a historical understanding of your issue is critical to understanding it in the present. Try restating your thesis statement as a 1 sentence concluding statement.