Essay 3 Rhetorical Analysis

Essay 3 – Rhetorical Analysis

 

The Rhetorical Analysis

 

Rhetorical Analysis

The purpose of a Rhetorical Analysis is to break down a text into its component parts and determine whether or not these components work well together to effectively communicate/argue the author’s perspective.  As such, you will be writing about how the author puts together their argument and NOT what they are arguing.

 

Invention and Research (i.e., discovering what you’re going to say in this paper)

  1. Find and read an appropriate argumentative text
    1. You will need to find an argumentative essay/article that covers your topic
    2. You should be looking for a text arguing the opposition’s point of view
    3. Try to identify the author’s thesis and their main arguments
  2. Re-read your text.
    1. What is the thesis, what is the overall argument the author presents?
    2. What did the author choose to study? Why?
    3. What is the writer’s purpose? To inform? To persuade? To criticize?
    4. Who is the author’s intended audience?
    5. How does the writer arrange his or her ideas? Chronologically?
    6. How does the writer use diction? (Word choice, arrangement, accuracy, is it formal, informal? Technical versus slang?)
    7. Does the writer use dialogue? Quotations? Why?
    8. Are important terms repeated?
    9. What is the sentence structure of text? Are there fragments, run-ons? Is it declarative, imperative, and/or exclamatory? What effect does this have?
    10. Does the writer use punctuation to create an effect? Italics, underlining, parentheses?
    11. Which marks does the writer use, and when?

 

Arrangement (i.e., organizing what you’re going to say in this paper) 

Ultimately, you want to organize your paper in the manner you think will prove most effective with your classmates and I, but here are some general guidelines:

 

  • Introduction – Introduce your topic and subject matter.  At this point, it might be appropriate to give a short summary of the text in question.
  • Thesis: You are making an argument, so you will need a thesis.  After analyzing the author’s rhetorical choices, you must decide whether the strategies applied make for an effective or ineffective argument.  Your thesis should reflect this.  Your thesis should basically state whether or not the text provides an effective argument or not.
  • Body Paragraph 1 – appeal (ethos, logos, pathos) or rhetorical strategy to be analyzed.
    • Clear topic sentence which details the appeal or strategy being analyzed and its effect
    • Identify supporting textual evidence.  DO NOT summarize.  Pinpoint examples and show its purpose
    • Transition
  • Body Paragraph 2 – appeal (ethos, logos, pathos) or rhetorical strategy to be analyzed.
    • Clear topic sentence which details the appeal or strategy being analyzed and its effect
    • Identify supporting textual evidence.  DO NOT summarize.  Pinpoint examples and show its purpose
    • Transition
  • Body Paragraph 3 – appeal (ethos, logos, pathos) or rhetorical strategy to be analyzed.
    • Clear topic sentence which details the appeal or strategy being analyzed and its effect
    • Identify supporting textual evidence.  DO NOT summarize.  Pinpoint examples and show its purpose
    • Transition
  • Conclusion –
    • Summarizing main ideas and re-stating thesis.
    • DO NOT introduce new information or new evidence

-adapted from “What in the world is a rhetorical analysis?

 

Evaluation Criteria

 

Levels of Achievement
Criteria Excellent Quality Very Good Quality Good Quality Average Quality Attempts Basic Standards Basic Standards NOT met
Formatting: Follows instructor’s formatting guidelines for this essay type. Times New Roman 12pt, 1000 words, etc 5 Points 4 Points 3 Points 2 Points 1 Points 0 Points
Finished: Points just because you did the assignment and completed all requirements. 5 Points 0 Points 0 Points 0 Points 0 Points 0 Points
Title reflects essay topic. Both are interesting and capture reader’s attention. 5 Points 4 Points 3 Points 2 Points 1 Points 0 Points
Introduction: Introduction contains all necessary information. 10 Points 8 Points 6 Points 4 Points 2 Points 0 Points
Thesis: Strong thesis. Thesis is a clear and focused statement. 15 Points 12 Points 9 Points 6 Points 3 Points 0 Points
Organization: Communicates a whole message that strongly stays on topic. There is a clear and logical organization in which features are discussed in an orderly fashion. 20 Points 16 Points 12 Points 8 Points 4 Points 0 Points
Support: Using clear, appropriate examples, explanations and details when necessary. 20 Points 16 Points 12 Points 8 Points 4 Points 0 Points
Major Errors: Demonstrates mastery of sentence structure and major grammar rules such as Run-ons, fragments, and S/V agreement. 15 Points 12 Points 9 Points 6 Points 3 Points 0 Points
Minor Errors: Demonstrates mastery of minor grammar issues such as comma usage and pronouns. 10 Points 12 Points 9 Points 6 Points 3 Points 0 Points
Voice: Clear voice and mature use of vocabulary. Mastery of spelling and word choice.  Clear indication that the audience is being taken into account 10 Points 8 Points 6 Points 4 Points 2 Points 0 Points
MLA Citation Method: Offers an honest attempt at using and formatting MLA citations and a Works Cited page 10 Points 8 Points 6 Points 4 Points 2 Points 0 Points

 

 

 

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