How does the concept of ‘Heraclitean fluxism,’ which Plato believes to be true of the material world, provide an argument against the sophist’s view of the concept in question?

 Plato’s Theaetetus

*At 151d-e, Theaetetus offers a preliminary definition of the concept in question, but Socrates claims that this definition resembles that of a famous (infamous?) sophist. Who is this sophist, and what is his theory about the concept in question?

In his preliminary objections to this sophist’s view, Socrates wonders why not just exchange his definition with animals such as pig or baboon. Why does Socrates make this claim, and what is he trying to imply by it?

In his first major argument, Socrates attempts to show that this sophist’s claim is self-refuting. Give at least one reason why it is.

What is the ‘argument from experts’ (171d-172c, 177c-179b) and how is it further strengthened when the expertise in question also involves future prediction, as it does in doctors, meteorologists, etc?

How does the concept of ‘Heraclitean fluxism,’ which Plato believes to be true of the material world, provide an argument against the sophist’s view of the concept in question?